Church sites to be sold

St Augustine’s Roman Catholic Church, Dorchester Road, Weymouth where Florence Jessie Tompkins and Francis Stephen Clark were married in 1918 is amongst the churches to be sold off in a reorganization of the Weymouth and Portland parishes of the Diocese of Plymouth. Read Martin Lea‘s story in the Dorset Echo.

Edward Wathen Fyffe (1853-1935)

Edward Wathen Fyffe (1853-1935)Edward Wathen Fyffe was born on December 31, 1853 at Woodchester, Gloucestershire, England the second son of Ebenezer Wathen Fyffe, a tea merchant and Martha Wathen Dunn. His elder brother, Ebenezer Thomas Fyffe becam a Naval Chaplain but Edward went into the family Tea business of E.W. Fyffe, Son and Co. In 1884 Edward married Ida Stanton Brown.

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No mercy shown in the prison ships era

“He was only nine years old, the son of a Cowgate tailor, certainly a little tearaway and deemed old enough to be taught the errors of his ways.”

Sandra  Dick reports in the Scotsman on the crimes which could cause draconian penalty of transportation to Australia in the 1800’s

http://living.scotsman.com/people.cfm?id=1173752007

Dame Freya Madeline Stark (1893-1993)

Freya Madeleine StarkFreya Madeline Stark was born on January 31, 1893 at Paris, France, the eldest daughter of Robert and Flora Stark.  Flora was Italian born,and it was there, two years later that Freya’s younger sister, Vera,  was born. Her childhood years were divided between the hill towns of northern Italy and the moors of southwest England. (Mother and daughters can be found at Chagford, Devon in the 1901 census).  

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Mysterious war memorial on beach

The BBC has a report on the mystery surrounding a plaque commemorating four soldiers who died during World War I, which was found on a beach at Mudeford Sandbank in Christchurch, Dorset.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/dorset/6919228.stm

Ella’s Story : Retirement

After considering several possible sites, we finally decided to have a bungalow built on the land bought from Mr. Noakes. So after thirty three years as mine host and mine hostess at the Apple Tree Inn we said goodbye and moved into the ‘Pippins’ a couple of hundred yards away in September 1959. We now had a care free life. Cecil was getting less angina pain. The American Government were still paying us a monthly compensation for the loss of Richard. We could afford a gardener and I had my rose garden.

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Marjorie Ethel Reeves (1905-2003)

Marjorie Ethel ReevesMarjorie Ethel Reeves was born at Bratton, Wiltshire  on July 17, 1905 the second daughter of Robert John W. Reeves and Edith Sarah Whitaker. Her father’s family owned and ran a successful iron works in the village making agricultural machinery. Her mothers family could trace its continuous presence in Bratton from 1576. Marjorie was brought up in Wiltshire and educated at the High School for Girls in Trowbridge before studying modern history at St Hugh’s College, Oxford.

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Ella’s Story : Post War Years

Jim safely came through the war years and stayed on in the RAF. But in February 22nd 1946 the Hudson aircraft, of which he was one of the three crew members, crashed north of Gemen in Westphalia, in Germany.

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Bessie Sicilia Roper (1910-2002)

Bessie Sicilia (Coombes) RoperBessie Sicilia Coombes was born in Pontypridd, South Wales, on May 15th 1910, the eldest daughter of George Coombs and Florrie House from Maiden Newton, Dorset, who had moved to South Wales to find work in the mines.  George Coombes was an ex-soldier of the Dorsetshire regiment who had served in the Tirah Campaign and Bessies unusual second name came from the troopship on which he returned to England.

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Correspondence

These are copies of actual correspondence received by the Family History Department, Salt Lake City, Utah.

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